Tournaments   The Club is participating in five tournaments in 2009...
 

   30 May
   Gloucester
  


  6 June
  Bristol


  20 June
  Exeter

  18 July
  Milton Keynes

  22 August
  Cardiff










Players from Gloucester, Bristol City, Bristol Uni, Taunton and even Manchester joined the ominously-named Exeter Thunder and Exeter Lightning at Bromhams Farm playing fields by the canal for our 2009 summer tournament.  Fortunately the rain largely held off and players soon got to grips with the gusty breeze - the sun even came out in the afternoon!

At the end of a limb-aching, where-did-that-sunburn- come-from-? good day of korf, Bristol City's victory was celebrated in traditional style with burgers and beer at Double Locks.

Exeter Thunder, playing in green, came 2nd, while the white Lightnings somehow managed to finish 4th despite seeming to win only two games all day. Well done all involved. Special mention must go to two former Exeter players - Simon, who came down from Manchester with two team-mates, and Karl, who made the journey from London. 








Sleeping arrangements

       #2        #3       #4

#5        Glos penalty                



 

 Haribo and other essentials - a quick guide to tournaments

In the summer korfball moves outside as clubs across the region, and further afield, host friendly tournaments. 

What's involved?

Most tournaments start at 10am, so an early departure from Exeter on Saturday morning is on the cards to allow for traveling time. Tournaments vary in size from half a dozen teams to 25 or more. The number of teams taking part will influence how long each game lasts but typically they are 20-30 mins long - much shorter than a league match of 60 mins. How many games we play will also depend on the number of teams and the format of the competition. About 6 - 8 games seems average. If you're keen you will normally have no difficulty playing extra games for teams who are low on numbers, or as part of a 'scratch' side to replace a team which hasn't been able to show up, for whatever reason. There will also be a fair bit of time sitting off in between games. This may be spent nattering, eating Haribo sweets or watching the other teams, as personal preference dictates. Volunteers may also be required to referee.

At the end of the day there is almost always a BBQ followed by a disco/assorted revelry. A charge in the region of 5-10 may be made for attending the BBQ/social. Many people wisely chose to camp overnight if they're planning on having more than the odd drink.

Playing Outside

Playing outside is a little different to playing in a sports hall. The grass surface means that studded boots are a very good idea! If the grass is wet, then running-in shots can be difficult even with studs. Long shots will also be hard if there's any significant wind. As a result, games played outside are generally lower scoring than those inside. This means every goal counts during the game. However the pitches tend to be larger outside (the proper size for a korfball pitch is 40m x 20m which is rarely achievable in a UK sports hall) so there is more space to escape your defender, if you can use it.

What should I bring?

  • Studded boots (astro-turf football boots are fine)
  • Lunch and snacks (better to have too much than not enough)
  • Drink (at least a litre)
  • Money for social or snacks during the day
  • Suncream
  • Waterproof
  • Warm clothing
  • Rubbish bag
  • Towel and shower stuff
  • Clean clothes for social / traveling back
  • Book / iPod / camera
  • Camping kit + torch if staying overnight
  • Petrol money for whoever gave you a lift
  • Rug / camp chair
  • Energy replacement tablets (Haribo sweets or Jelly babies seem to work particularly well. High level research is continuing into yogurt covered raisins...)
What does it cost?

If you pay your club fees by direct debit you are entitled to free entry in the five tournaments listed at the top of the page . If you are on pay-as-you-go, please see the club treasurer; the cost is likely to be about 4 per event.

Understanding the Format

No one seems to understand tournament formats, including the people organising them. Often however there will be a series of group matches played in the morning with the results of that initial stage informing the fixtures in a second group stage or a knock out stage, or both, in the afternoon. This means that the afternoon games are generally more competitive and evenly matched, as inexperienced teams are less likely to meet experienced ones. The semi-finals and final are usually played as knock outs.

Why?

Well why not? Tournaments are a great way to feel part of the sport, meet other korfers and play as many games as your legs will take in the fresh air.  Plus there's beer afterwards!


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