Free Pass tactics   
 

 Coach's Notes
 


The first video shows the basic free pass formation and standard defence (at 1:55 and 3:08). The taker passes to the side and steps away from the post to increase the distance from his defender. He receives a pass back and shoots. The defender runs out as quickly as possible to block the shot.


In the second, the defender of the shooter takes up a position behind him as we practised (0:12). The taker now cannot move back away from the post because it closes the distance between him and his defender rather than lengthening it. If he moves forwards he risks getting to close to the defender under the post. He elects to stay where his is but cannot get the shot away quickly enough.


Finally, another example of the new style defence we practiced (1:04). Here the taker gets caught by both defenders - the one coming from behind and the one coming from under the post. Unfortunately both defenders stay with the taker rather than one of them going after the other girl player once the taker has been successfully defended.

It looks like the player who ends up shooting could have initially taken a position closer to the post and received a pass straight away. Remember though that the attackers have to be 2.5 metres from each other. But why not pass straight to her anyway since she's not defended? Because the defence can prepare for that too. Spin the tape forward to 3:20 and you'll see a boy preparing to intercept that pass had it been made. (A flat pass would not clear the two boys standing together; a high loopy one might not reach before the moving boy intercepts).

Actually if you can spare 4 minutes of your life this is quite a nice video to watch all the way through. It opens with a nice example of a girl trying to prevent a feed coming in, as we are trying now to do ourselves, and there is plenty of opportunity to see the block at the post to obtain a collect that we've been practising. Also note that despite the great play and big crowd we have the superior scoreboard. Yay us.

Alan,
Oct '11